Five Steps to Successfully Transition to Long Term Remote Work

Remote work has become the new reality for many workers around the world. Now that workers are entering their ninth month of telecommuting, what started as something they had to reckon with for just a few weeks is turning into a more long-term arrangement, forcing enterprises to shift their entire working culture to figure out what works (and what doesn’t) as they go along. Now that companies are expecting to extend telecommuting through 2021, they are faced with effectively transitioning employees into working from home for the long term. If your company has decided to turn its remote situation into a more permanent solution, there are steps you can take to make the transition as smooth as possible. 

Encourage Employees to Create a Dedicated Workspace

If your team is used to commuting to an office, it can be difficult to trick the mind into focusing elsewhere. The best way to compensate for this is by encouraging your team members to put together a dedicated space in their home and try to emulate a working environment as much as possible. Even if it’s just a computer monitor on the dining room table or a desk in their room, having a space to walk away from at the end of the day can help facilitate healthy mental transitions between work and personal time. And speaking of which…

Set Boundaries Between Work Time and Personal Time

One of the most common complaints about remote work from employees revolves around an inability to demarcate between their job and their home life. And now, since work is at home, that line is becoming even more blurred which can lead to a litany of issues like employee burnout, lost productivity, and general worker unhappiness.  In fact, “a global study conducted by Qualtrics, SAP and Mind Share Partners found that over 40% of respondents said their mental health has declined since the outbreak of COVID-19, with more workers reporting high levels of anxiety and stress.”

Do your best to create firm working hours for your team and encourage all team members to stick to them (that means in their own interactions as well). Nine times out of ten, that after-hours Slack message or work email can wait until the morning. It will be okay. 

Power Up Productivity With Out-of-the-Box Communication Tactics

If you’re anything like some of the companies we talk to, your inbox has been overflowing and overwhelming since the beginning of the pandemic. You’re probably also suffering from some severe “Zoom burnout” as well since businesses are increasingly using video conferencing solutions to conduct meetings. And while both of these are convenient ways to communicate, they both exacerbate the daily stressors your employees are already contending with. That’s why some of the most forward-thinking leaders are reimagining what the corporate communication and training structure should look like in order to better suit the needs of their workers and the demands of the current climate. And many are finding video is the solution they need for the moment. 

Not only does recording a quick video do a good job of capturing essential information quickly, but it also gives your workers a point of reference to refer back to at a later time in case they forget something. The best part is that you don’t just need to use video to capture one-off communications. It can also be used for:

  • All-hands, team, or department meetings: Employees are usually spread out across many different time zones and have other commitments so it can be difficult to get everyone together at the same time, in the same way. Video enables you to share key company communications with your employees and guarantee they are able to access the information at a time that works for them, whether it’s while multitasking at work, exercising at the gym, or just doing chores around the house.
  • Policy updates
  • Providing a central repository for company communications, announcements, and onboarding modules
  • Amplifying executive-employee communications
  • Encourage on-the-job training and continuous learning
  • Tips the department can use
  • A use case they are working on and how they solved the problem
  • Product updates
  • Fun content that shows their office or workspace
  • How they are spending their day

The numbers don’t lie: “According to a recent study, 76 percent of companies who used video found improved communications among remote employees, while 58 percent of companies found “increased alignment with company and organizational goals.”

Overcommunicate

It might seem antithetical to the point we laid out above but it’s really not. The fact is, overcommunication is critical for teams working remotely, as there are significant nuance and nonverbal cues that are removed when teams go virtual. This is particularly troublesome when tones are misread or something is assumed..but it’s just another reason to consider capturing communications on video. Not only does this extra layer of personability become essential to maintaining bonds between team members, but it can also help you continue to cultivate a positive company culture, even when you can’t be in the same room. 

Implement the Proper Communication Tools

Of course, creating these great communications really is only half the battle: you also need a place to store them and create a tech infrastructure that works. For video to become a seamless part of your company’s communication and training efforts, you should implement an enterprise video management platform that seamlessly integrates with your existing tech stack. These features are especially important:

  • Enterprise-grade security: You’ll likely be sharing sensitive information, so your platform needs to incorporate the latest security protocols to keep communication from getting leaked. 
  • Access controls: The capability to restrict viewing to specific groups, teams, and individuals should be available. 
  • Mobile-friendly: Information should be readily available, allowing your employees to access the most up-to-date information at any time, from anywhere, regardless of if they have wifi access or not.
  • Analytics: Communication managers should have access to an extensive analytics suite that gives them insight into who is watching content, what they are watching, and when. Utilizing these data points can help you create a data-informed strategy that can help your company drive better ROI, even if you’re in the middle of a pandemic. 

By putting the proper tools and protocols in place, you can set your employees up for a long-term remote work experience that is productive and contributes to the overall well-being of team members and company alike. 

If you’d like to learn more about how CircleHD’s Enterprise Video Management platform can help you communicate better at your enterprise, we’d love to chat


How to Get the Most Out of Your Video Content Management Tool

As more and more businesses are driven online, the use of video for training, communication, enablement, and other organizational functions is growing. But even before this great remote work experiment began, enterprises were still having to contend with an often-confusing matrix of overlapping solutions to manage their internal (and sometimes external) content. 

Instead of parsing together different tools to manage a wide range of assets, companies are increasingly turning to video content management platforms to securely create, host, and share information with their employees. But these solutions are only as useful as you make them. To set your team up for success, follow these best practices. 

It’s All About the Set-Up

Whether you already have a video content management system in place or are looking to implement one, it’s always a good idea to go back to basics and get a holistic view of what assets you have. Too often, content is created and then forgotten about, which can lead to employees referring to outdated information. 

While it might seem overwhelming to clean up, it doesn’t have to be. Like anything, this process becomes much more manageable if you break it down into bite-sized pieces. Create a spreadsheet of all existing assets, noting the name of the item, what type of file it is, a short description of its use, and a link to where it’s currently being stored. This will help you assess where updates are needed, give you valuable insights into what files you may want to toss, and help you address any areas where more content may be needed. 

Categorize With Effectiveness

It’s no secret that more content brings more problems, particularly when it comes to effectively storing it. After all, your assets are only as good as how discoverable they are. Employees have reported spending 43 hours every month searching for information (that’s over 500 hours a year), which contributes to lost productivity and a suffering bottom line. 

But there’s also a silent issue that many leaders don’t talk about or address: information overload. Even when there’s not a pandemic going on, workers are often constantly barraged by an onslaught of email and Slack messages, which results in key information getting lost in a black hole. 

Couple these issues together and you have a recipe for disaster, which is why categorizing your content is arguably the most critical piece of the puzzle when it comes to ensuring the adoption of a corporate video portal across your enterprise. 

Increase to usefulness and discoverability of your content by:

  • Separating assets into channels based on goals, subject matter, or function, similar to Netflix. The best part about setting your files up this way versus a “catch-all” folder is that you’re able to quickly add a piece of content into a track with a simple click whereas it’s more difficult to add new folders to a large store of existing content while retaining their discoverability. 
  • Ensuring everything uploaded has relevant tags. Hot tip: a good way to keep tagging structures consistent is to create a document everyone on your team can refer to that outlines what type of content should be paired with certain keywords. If you’re like us and prefer things to be more uniform, putting a naming convention for all files in place can also help keep things organized. 
  • Adding contextual information. After all, information is only as good as the background you can provide on it. You wouldn’t just jump into the middle of a movie you’ve never seen without understanding the plot that led up to that point, would you? The good news is that providing this information doesn’t have to be as complicated as it sounds; it is easily achieved by adding a thumbnail that provides a clue as to what the file is about, or a short description to accompany the name. 
  • Annotating your assets and leaving important insights about content for others to refer back to. This could be in the form of notes about changes, new information, or when a certain tactic or skill should be used. This provides an easy way for thoughts and advice to be captured for posterity and is a great way for teams to collaborate and share what they have learned–a very useful feature for preserving training or sales intelligence. 

Secure Your Content

Having great assets and storing them effectively is a great start, but you also need to have a solid security strategy to prevent information from falling into the wrong hands (and, in turn, your company falling into a potential PR disaster). But sometimes, the reasons to secure your content aren’t always so clandestine: you may want to restrict content to certain teams or levels of seniority, for example. Whatever your use case, you should be using a platform that utilizes the latest enterprise-grade security protocols such as end-to-end encryption, SSO, and custom access controls. 

Another good best practice to follow includes critically assessing what levels and permissions you want to grant for each uploaded piece of content in order to keep your most sensitive information as secure as possible. 

Cast a Wider Net

Giving employees the ability to access content on their own terms is incredibly powerful for any enterprise. Whether your company is still working in-house, or you’re distributed, there’s still a great need to access information as conveniently as possible. This is where a dedicated mobile application is especially helpful. Even if people are working from home, they are still driving places in their car, going for a run, or doing things that don’t require them to be at a desk. In fact, 60% of employees use apps for work-related activity.

But there’s a prevailing idea that creating such a tool would require a ton of money or resources but that’s actually not the case. A video content management system like CircleHD comes with a native app that you’re able to custom brand so it becomes a natural extension of your organization. By having an iOS or Android application in place, you enable company information or training to be accessed 24/7 from anywhere in the world regardless of time zone or internet connectivity (and without the hurdles of trying to use a clunky VPN or a Learning Management System that isn’t optimized for mobile). 

Measure the Impact

Content is only as good as the impact it’s having and the truth is you cannot measure its usefulness or impact without proper analytics. But the truth is most systems only give you superficial insights that don’t really help you make data-driven decisions that impact ROI. 

When it comes to determining what content is working best for your teams and new hires, you’ll want to look at metrics like:

  • Who is watching videos
  • When they are watching videos
  • How long they are engaging with the content
  • Where they may have dropped off or had trouble

By understanding these data points, you can make informed decisions about what type of content to create and what may not be as helpful. 

No matter where your teams are working from, it’s important to empower them with the tools and information they need to stay in the loop and do their job effectively. By putting the proper tools and processes in place and being intentional about communications, you’ll create a winning strategy and get the most mileage possible out of your corporate video portal.


Do you want to learn more about how you can effectively implement a video content management tool at your enterprise? Let’s talk


Business Benefits Of Using An Enterprise Video Content Management System

Video has been having quite a moment for a few years now. In fact, in the US alone, users watch over 180 million hours of video content on a daily basis; This accounts for 75% of internet users–a number that is projected to grow in the coming decades. 

While this medium started out primarily as a function of marketing, enterprise leaders have been clued into all the ways video can help transform other areas of their business for a while now. But while video offers enterprises unparalleled business and communication value compared to other communication delivery avenues, more content can mean more problems, particularly around how you effectively store, share, access, and keep track of assets without them getting lost in an endless stream of online noise and chatter. That’s why savvy business leaders are turning to enterprise video content management systems. 

What is an enterprise video content management system?

Simply put, a video content management system is a solution that allows companies to centralize, manage, and deliver content online. And while that functionality sounds simple, it’s more than that. 

Typically, organizations will store any files in a program like Dropbox, Sharepoint, Box, Google Drive, or something similar and assume that method will translate effectively for video content. But the reality is that these systems aren’t set up to handle video files, nor do they come equipped with proper the search or discovery functions needed to help your video content get the mileage it should. 

To start, if you’re using a traditional enterprise video solution, you’re bound to pretty strict file size restrictions. Sharepoint, for example, only allows uploads of 50 MB or less, a feat easily exceeded by a simple webcam or smartphone video–which makes storing 30-minute all-hands meetings, lengthy town halls, or even short training modules next to impossible. 

But what about my LMS?

We’ve written at length about why traditional Learning Management Systems are ill-equipped to handle the needs of the modern enterprise. Not only are these systems plagued by poor user experience, but they’re also traditionally very cumbersome when it comes to uploading new content and making it discoverable. Some don’t even offer native support for video or the ability to access content from mobile devices. 

Ok, so I’ll just use a private YouTube (or Vimeo) channel.

We love YouTube just as much as the next person and appreciate the value it offers to marketing and sales teams but, the truth is that, when it comes to effectively managing your internal video content, it’s just not a great solution. Not only are public video networks a real security threat to enterprises, but you also open yourself up to a host of other issues, including:

  • Loss of proprietary content: We’ve heard so many horror stories from our customers and beyond about some of the new policies YouTube is implementing, which can lead to loss of your company content and channels being deleted with no notice. When you hand over your videos to a third party, you put all your creations at the mercy of that platform and risk logging in one day only to see everything you’ve put your blood, sweat, and tears into has vanished into thin air.

  • No control over what content your videos are paired with: YouTube’s recommendation tool is great for wasting time on the platform but, as we know, sometimes intelligent tools aren’t as smart as we’d like them to be. You have no idea if your videos will be paired up with competitor content, irrelevant information that leads the viewer away, or even videos that are offensive or tasteless. 

By implementing an enterprise video solution, you not only get the peace of mind that comes along with retaining control over your content, but you are able to take advantage of advanced security protocols, such as encryption and access controls, to keep sensitive information from prying eyes.

How Else Can a Video Content Management System Benefit Me?

The most basic corporate video portals should enable you to build a repository of files and share those with relevant stakeholders. But the best solutions available on the market today go beyond that, offering features like:

  • Support for large files, high-definition, and 4K video: Consider a minute of video can easily put you over the allotted upload size for many commonly used solutions and you’ll understand why this support is critical to growing your enterprise video content library. Further, even if you do have a product in place that can handle larger files, it’s very likely you will spend more time than you want waiting for videos to upload.

  • Native video creation tools:  Once upon a time, creating video was a time-consuming, expensive process that typically required special equipment and a lot of manpower. But that’s no longer true. With all the technological advances that have been made over the last few years, video tools are more accessible than ever. Most enterprise content management systems have built-in recording tools that let you quickly capture video or screen shares directly from your portal, cutting down on the time it takes to get your content live.

  • Automatic closed-captioning and transcription:  When it comes to creating videos, the content is only as good as who can access it. That’s why ensuring every word spoken is able to be understood by everyone at your organization, regardless of abilities, it absolutely crucial. A video content management system should be able to process speech to text automatically, at no time cost to you, so your company stays ADA compliant and inclusive.

  • Intelligent search: And speaking of speech to text–it’s not enough to just put your videos out there, caption them, and call it a day. Your content needs to be easily discoverable. Consider, for example, that sales reps spend upwards of 43 hours a month looking for the right piece of content to send to a prospect. That’s over 500 hours a year of wasted productivity. If you choose an enterprise video content management solution that has speech to text capabilities, you are not only able to search your video library based on keywords and metadata, but you can also find where any word or phrase was spoken in your content.

  • Mobile optimization: Despite living in an increasingly moble-first world, the sad reality is that many legacy systems are not equipped to be accessed from anywhere. Take, for example, WebEx recordings: in their default format, sessions are unable to be viewed on tablets or smartphones when posted to Sharepoint. A corporate video portal will not only be compatible with your team’s mobile browsers, but the best ones will have a dedicated iOS and/or Android app which allows employees can access your video library 24/7. The ability to custom brand this app should also be available so the mobile experience becomes a natural extension of your company.

  • Extensive analytics: Most legacy systems only include analytics as an after-thought and the reporting won’t give you deep insights that help you have thoughtful decisions about your video content strategy–if you get any data at all. By choosing an enterprise video content management system for your assets, you can gain insights into datapoints like who is looking at your content, when they are accessing it, how engaged they were with it, for how long, and more. By generating these types of custom usage reports, you’re able to think more critically about the videos you’re creating and provide more value to your organization. 

With the right tools in place, video can become a very powerful tool for onboarding, training, and other communication functions at your enterprise. If you’d like to learn more about how CircleHD can help you become a video-first organization, we’d love to chat.


Microsoft Stream and Best-of-Breed Video Management Platforms

When evaluating a content management platform for your company’s onboarding, training, sales enablement, or internal communications efforts, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by options. While many seem similar on the surface, once implemented, you may find key functionalities missing or worse, encounter a difficult user experience. That’s why we’re putting together a series of blog posts to help guide you in your solution evaluation process. Today, we’ll be talking about Microsoft Stream.

At first glance, Microsoft’s Stream offering seems attractive, especially if offered at no cost as part of a bundle with Office 365 (note: it’s not actually free. Users have noted that you need to get Office 365 licensing for administrator accounts before you can manage Stream). But when looking into the ability to store, organize and share video and other dynamic content, it makes sense to take a closer look at what specific functionality is available.

Native Recording Tools and Support for External Content

Video platforms often feature a range of bells and whistles, but often core functionalities like native recording are missing. This is a problem since it forces users to either purchase another tool to complement the solution or requires someone on your team have sophisticated video production knowledge.

In the past, uploading original video content to Microsoft Stream was complicated and cumbersome at best. Today, they have fully-integrated recording tools.

Similarly, CircleHD enables users to upload any previously created media like video to the platform, but it also offers support for slides, text content, and audio files like podcasts. Since the solution has built-in audio and video recording tools, users are able to produce, upload, and share new content in a matter of minutes without the need for any extra production tools.

But unlike Microsoft Stream, CircleHD’s platform offers a wide range of support for both internal and external content. Not only does the platform support importing video directly from YouTube and 243 other sources, but it also lets you go beyond uploading so you can share media with audiences outside of your organization. That means partners, customers, and other cohorts are able to receive your content should you wish to distribute it, whether for training, sales, marketing purposes–or something else. 

Channels

We all know that it isn’t enough to just create new content, you also need an effective way to store it.

Both Microsoft Stream and CircleHD allow you to create public and private channels where your files can be hosted, but the latter is a little more flexible. While Stream has no way to disable a user’s ability to add and remove videos from company-wide channels, CircleHD encourages administrators to take ownership of the platform’s channel settings. This means you have the option to curate content yourself or, alternatively, grant permissions to department leaders so they may customize it based on the team’s needs and goals.

Playlists

While Channels are a great way to sort content, sometimes, they don’t go far enough. Most organizations need the ability to order and sequence content for optimum training purposes, not just the ability to save it in a particular bucket. That’s where playlists come in.

CircleHD allows users to sort video, slide, and podcast content into playlists, similar to YouTube–a basic function that is not available in Stream. If you’re looking for your content management platform to serve any sort of training or onboarding purpose, this feature is a must-have, as it makes creating custom courses simple and intuitive.

Quizzes, Gamification and Certification

Studies have shown that 65 percent of information is forgotten just seven days after a training session. After six months, that number jumps to 90 percent. But these stats aren’t unique to training–they also apply to all-hands meetings, department sync ups, sales seminars, and more. Incorporating video is just one piece of the puzzle when it comes to encouraging knowledge retention across your organization–you should also be incorporating quizzes to fight against information loss.

Microsoft offers this capability, but not natively: you’ll need to use their Forms product in tandem. This might be a roadblock for the typical user who just wants to pair a simple test with content.

By contrast, CircleHD lets you create quizzes directly on the platform and easily integrate it with your content–whether it’s a standalone piece or part of a training track. Some other companion features include the ability to generate certificates upon the completion of a course and the option to enable a leaderboard for those teams that are particularly driven by healthy competition (we’re looking at you, sales).

It’s possible some of these functions may someday be added to the Microsoft Stream roadmap, and perhaps later released. Until then, it may make sense for your organization to go with a more comprehensive video management platform if you’re looking for these particular features.

Closed-Captioning

It’s today’s world, it’s not enough to just produce great video content, you also need to make sure it’s accessible to everyone in your organization. While both Stream and CircleHD have automatic transcription tools, CircleHD supports multiple closed-captioning for video, letting end-users upload video with captions in multiple languages. 

Access Controls

Permissions for content can create additional security concerns for enterprises. After all, you want to be sure that sensitive information isn’t leaked and is only being shared with your intended recipients. Both Microsoft Stream and CircleHD have admin management features for videos and channels, as well as the ability to make content private, but CircleHD allows you to restrict your content to certain groups or individuals. You can also use active directory groups and HRIS attributes, such as department and cost center names, to limit access to a specific audience.

CircleHD’s access control settings

Interestingly, in Stream, there is no feature to securely share videos and other content with third parties like partners and customers, something CircleHD is able to do without sacrificing security.

Content Discovery

Did you know sales reps spend close to 43 hours every month searching for information? That’s over 500 hours a year. Even if you’re not in sales, chances are, you spend a lot more time than you’d like looking for documents and other information. Imagine what you could get done if you got even a fraction of that time back? That’s why it’s so critical to ensure your content management platform has a user-interface that makes search quick, easy, and intuitive. CircleHD makes search easier with tags, metadata, and custom fields so you can set your own classification parameters.

A great feature both platforms have is the ability to search channels and videos using intelligent speech to text transcription capabilities. This means you are able to find where specific words and phrases occur in your content. No more wondering, “who said that?”

Reporting and Analytics

Reporting is an area where many solutions often fall short but it’s such a critical component of communications success. After all, if you don’t know how people are engaging with your content, it’s impossible to have a full understanding of how to iterate and pivot your strategy to achieve your goals.

Stream has access to likes, views, and comments data, but not much else. CircleHD has a robust analytics suite with built-in employee segmentation and KPI tools so you get key insights like who is viewing your content, when they are viewing it, for how long, and more. Their playlist analytics can also track if employees are viewing your content alongside a quiz when it’s assigned, and let you see how team members are progressing.

Since CircleHD’s reporting capabilities are so extensive and able to give administrators a detailed picture of department and employee-level engagement, enterprises are able to clearly see the ROI of video usage across the organization. 

Integration with Cloud Web Conferencing

Recording and managing online meetings and webinars is fast becoming one of the main use cases for video content. While many platforms claim they integrate with the top conferencing solutions, the way they integrate can have big impacts on usability.

Of course, Microsoft Stream supports its own proprietary webcast solutions, but it seems these days, everyone has their own preference for which platform to use. Even if you use a Microsoft product for some of your webcasts, your recorded Zoom, Slack, WebEx, and GoToMeeting sessions will not be auto-saved to your Stream repository.

By contrast, CircleHD has native integrations that support all of these platforms (as well as over 200 other integrations…but that’s for another time), which can be a life-saver when it comes to keeping all your recordings (and sanity) in one place.

Cost

You might be thinking, “All these features are great, but what’s it going to cost me?”

The good news is that CircleHD is actually one of the most competitively-priced solutions on the market today, with user seats coming in at a mere $4.99 per person plus custom pricing for larger enterprises. The standard business plan gets you a whopping TB of bandwidth per month and 4 TB’s of storage.

By contrast, Microsoft Stream can get pretty pricey. According to their website, “Microsoft Stream includes a base amount of storage. A Microsoft Stream tenant receives a fixed allocation of 500 GB of storage and an additional 0.5 GB of storage per licensed user…Additional Microsoft Stream storage is available for purchase separately.”

And the costliness of Stream has not gone unnoticed with multiple posts on their own forum commenting on it, including this one: “I was reviewing [the storage page] to explain Storage in Stream to a colleague and why some organizations disable uploads to Stream.  I was also shocked when I read that an additional 500 GB of Stream storage would cost $1200 a year.  I understand that Stream storage has much more value (searchable transcript, player, captions, etc) than a 500 GB disk drive which you can buy for between $30 – $80, but $1200 each and every year for an additional 500 GB of storage seems excessively high to me.”

With additional features, more flexibility, and higher storage limits, CircleHD is the clear winner here. 


Driving Digital Transformation at Your Enterprise with Video

We live in a time where innovation and change happen at warp speed. No matter how far we come, there always seem to be new technological advances right around the corner. This is why it’s so paramount that business leaders stay agile and look for processes that can be improved with a little bit of digital transformation.

If you’ve heard that phrase before and are a bit confused by it, you’re not alone. Digital transformation has been a buzz word touted by some of the biggest companies in the world over the last few years. In fact, studies have revealed that 70% of companies either have a digital transformation strategy in place or are working on one. And while the oft-talked about part of digital transformation is the reimagination of the employee and customer experience, it’s what happens behind the scenes to enable virtual worker collaboration and knowledge sharing that really helps businesses run more efficiently and effectively.

The Main Areas of Digital Transformation

Leading digital change requires managers to have a distinct vision of how to transform their organization for our fast-moving world. If you’re trying to break digital transformation down into silos, you’ll find that it’s easier said than done and experts vary greatly in their assessment of how many areas there are in a model–the number has ranged from three to nine. So where should you begin looking and what activities are the best opportunities for your business? 

According to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, “CEOs should focus on these areas in digital transformation:

  • Empowering employees. As change managers know, employee motivation and skills are critical for organizational transformations – including digital transformations – to succeed. 
  • Engaging customers. Customer engagement matters just as much as employee engagement, which means businesses must meet the evolving expectations of today’s customers. 
  • Optimize operations. Infrastructure modernization is one of the best ways that digital transformation can help improve organizational effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Services and products. Innovation is one of the best ways to fuel success in the modern age, helping organizations improve their market position, capture more revenue, and stay relevant.”

With the right strategy, approach, and execution, an organization can change the way it operates and delivers value to customers and stakeholders.

Why Companies Struggle With Digital Transformation

It’s a well-documented fact that companies can find themselves behind digitally and suffer from strategic decisions they made 20 years ago. In fact, 73 percent of enterprises failed to provide any business value from their transformation efforts. That’s a pretty dismal figure and while stagnation can happen for many reasons, they usually fall into three main areas:  

Your company lacks organizational commitment

Whether you’re trying to implement a broader cultural change at your company or attempting to introduce new technology into your stack, it’s important that everyone is on the same page about the concept and vision needed to transform. 

We all know that getting everyone on board with a  new initiative can be like herding cats on a good day and It can be even more difficult if your organization is dealing with extra stressors, such as a global pandemic. There are two ways to bridge this adoption gap:

  1. Spell out the need for the change you are proposing: This might mean building a hypothetical use case that illustrates how transforming will improve your company’s position in the market, how it changes the customer experience, or how it will help people save time and boost efficiency–even if specifics aren’t known up front.

  2. Encourage ownership: The benefits of employee engagement are well documented and one of the most important tools to build this is involvement. According to Gallup, “When people are part of the solution and know they are a valuable part of the work and decisions being made, that is to say, when they have a sense of ownership — and if they know what excellence and success look like — they are that much closer to being engaged.”

    Look critically at all the steps you need to talk in order for your transformation to be successful and divvy some of that work out to your team members. Not only will they feel like they are a critical component to the company’s success, but they will be more likely to encourage other members of the organization to adopt as well.

The biggest thing to remember is that all changes take time so there’s no shame in taking it slow. If you try to begin the digital transformation process without having a clear roadmap that helps others understand why you are doing this in the first place, you risk alienating the people involved and at worst, find yourself dealing with a lot of frustration and passive-aggressive behavior. 

Failure to pivot

When planning your digital transformation, it can be tempting to build a detailed 18-month or even two-year plan that outlines how you would implement it but this approach is incredibly flawed because it doesn’t give you room to iterate. 

I always say that strategy should almost never be set in stone and there should always be room to account for variables. Since change happens at the drop of a hat these days, you want to be as nimble as possible and break your plan down into shorter projects that can be measured for impact as you go along. This will also help your company pivot easier when new technologies or events disrupt your industry while ensuring you’re able to keep your plan strategically aligned with the original intent. If you build on your learnings with every sprint, you’ll get more value in the long run. 

Taking a “tech first” approach without considering the rest of the picture

When it comes to transformation, so many people get bogged down by the technological aspects that they often forget all about approaching it mindfully, which can be a recipe for disaster. A study by MIT found that “the strength of digital technologies…doesn’t lie in the technologies individually. Instead, it stems from how companies integrate them to transform their businesses and how they work.” 

The good news is that you don’t need to be a tech wizard to drive change at your company, you just need to have an understanding of the role it plays in the ever-changing business landscape. When building your digital transformation strategy, these are some key areas to consider:

  1. Define the business objectives

    Did you know 78 percent of companies fail to meet their business transformation objectives? Often, it’s because the organization has no focus. Instead of thinking about programs and solutions in a silo, consider them from the perspective of how each will help you achieve specific business objectives. Make a list of what your company hopes to achieve and select solutions that will help you meet those specific goals.

  2. Involve stakeholders to understand what works

    As much as we’d all love to be experts in every area that drives our organization, it’s more realistic (and less cumbersome on your time) to pull in stakeholders from key areas to guide your efforts. They will have in-depth knowledge of what works (and what doesn’t), help you gain insight into workflow processes, and determine where new tech may be most effective.
     
  3. Gain Insights into the Customer Experience

    If your ultimate goal is to improve the customer experience, it is essential that your strategy is focused on external goals rather than internal company objectives. Gather customer feedback and use it to inform your approach. It’s also a good idea to reach out to any personnel in the company who regularly have contact with clients and customers to get a better idea of common pain points.

Where Does Video Fit In?

If you’re an enterprise leader working through the first steps of a digital transformation, from assessing the current landscape to defining the vision and building the roadmap, you might be surprised to find that video is actually the perfect medium for transforming collaborative and operational processes for your workforce. 

With more workers being driven online and business increasingly being conducted in a remote environment, it should come as no surprise that the use of video tools like Zoom and Google Meet are having a moment

But the effective use of video goes beyond virtual conferencing and leaders are putting this medium to work in a number of different ways. If you’re looking for ways to transform your company’s operational and collaborative processes, these are a few key areas where you may be able to benefit:

Onboarding 

The importance of a well-executed onboarding process cannot be overstated–a study by Glassdoor revealed “organizations with a strong onboarding process improve new hire retention by 82% and productivity by over 70%”. But retention rate isn’t the only metric affected by effective onboarding procedures: you also see impacts on job satisfaction, performance, and the company’s bottom line. 

By using video for your on boarding procedures, you not only keep the information and process consistent, but are able to save yourself time on a process that’s typically repeatable. 

Partner and Customer Training

When it comes to scaling your business, customer and partner training should be at the forefront of your mind. Your company can have the greatest product or service around but it won’t matter if the learning curve is so steep that adoption is difficult which is why video is also a great vehicle for saving time and streamlining your partner and customer training processes. 

Once upon a time, writing an absurdly large manual, coupled with a week-long, on-site seminar was the way customer and partner training was conducted. It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to easily understand why this method is ineffective, difficult to scale and prohibitively expensive.

Not only is video more engaging for the end user, it will also help increase information retention levels and reduce customer churn. In fact, a research report found people are 75% more likely to watch a video than to read documents, emails, or web articles.

Internal Communications

When communicating crucial information and company announcements, it can be tempting to just send an email or post something on your company intranet, but enterprise video gives senior leaders more control over messaging and It’s an easy way to tell a story in a more personalized way that is engaging for everyone at your organization. When you use video to communicate key information at your company, you not only humanize the message, but you’re able to capture the information for posterity and enable all company personnel to access the communication at a time that’s convenient for them, regardless of geographical location or time zone. This also makes video a great vehicle for capturing all-hands or department meetings.

Share Knowledge Across Your Organization

Companies tend to struggle with effective knowledge sharing across the organization, and it’s not atypical for critical information to exist in silos or with one person. 

Picture this: you have someone at your company who is incredibly skilled on a particular software you use or a process used internally. But one day, that person leaves the company and that information is lost. If it was captured on video, the process of passing that knowledge on to someone else at the company would be much easier. There’s also the added benefit of time management at play here, since video content takes less time to produce than written documentation. 

Encourage Continuous Learning

What if you could implement a solution that would increase employee productivity by 200%? It might sound like a laborious, complicated endeavor, but it’s actually as simple as providing your workforce with training and development. 

According to a study by Capgemini Consulting, “only one in ten adults in the U.S. feel that they have sufficient computer and Internet skills to use the digital tools they’re responsible for in their daily work.”

Employers need to go beyond initial on-the-job training and nurture development with continuous learning in order to keep pace with the rate of technological change. Enabling video allows you to create tracks to support ongoing coaching efforts. The best part is that these on-demand training modules empower employees to learn on-the-go and on their own time. 

Build an inclusive culture when all employees contribute

Building a company culture that gets your workers excited should already be top of mind for any organization but the hurdles can seem insurmountable when your team is distributed. How do you encourage engagement when physical presence isn’t possible? After all, video conferencing and chatting to each other can only get you so far.

A Gallup survey revealed that only 30 percent of full-time employees in the United States feel engaged at work. Those who are emotionally disconnected from their companies may end up working against their employers’ interests: they are less productive, more likely to steal, can negatively influence their coworkers, miss workdays, and drive customers away.

Video is still one of the most effective tools your company can use to call employees to action. In fact, employees are often a company’s most under-utlized storytellers and champions. Consider building a video library where all your team members can upload and contribute their own content. Not only does this help build connection at your organization, it can help transform company culture and boost morale.

Other Use Cases for Video

When it comes to using video in your transformation efforts, only your imagination is the limit, but some other ways you might include it include:

  • Troubleshooting videos for common customer problems and pain points
  • In-depth product demos your sales team can use
  • Sales presentations

Implementing a Video Solution at Your Company

Identifying areas for transformation and aligning internal teams is only half the battle. For video to become a natural part of your business transformation plan, you should employ the use of a platform that can seamlessly integrate with your existing tech stack.

Some features you should look for in a hub include:

  • Enterprise-grade security: You’ll likely be sharing sensitive information, so your platform needs to incorporate the latest security protocols to keep communication from getting leaked. 
  • Access controls: The capability to restrict viewing to specific groups, teams, and individuals should be available. 
  • Mobile-friendly: Information should be readily available, allowing your employees to access the most up-to-date information at any time, from anywhere, regardless of if they have wifi access or not.
  • Analytics: Communication managers should have access to an extensive analytics suite that gives them insight into who is watching content, what they are watching and when. Utilizing these data points can also let you know how engaged people are with the video content you’re producing and give an overall impression of what impact your digital transformation efforts are having.

Of course, there’s still this prevailing idea that creating video content is difficult or requires costly investment. With all the advances in technology, that adage is no longer true. Today’s enterprise video platforms are both easy to use and integrate seamlessly into existing infrastructure–whether your company has a dedicated media room, or you’re just using the built-in audio/video features on your computer. 

That in mind, it’s incredibly easy to get started incorporating this medium into your company’s digital transformation strategy and it can have a huge impact when used properly. When a company takes a tool like video and goes beyond the base features, they’re likely to see a positive impact on employee performance, operations and overall engagement—things many organizations strive to achieve in the first place.

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If you’d like to learn more about how you can incorporate video into your enterprise’s transformation efforts, we’d love to talk to you. Contact us today


Why Video Should Be a Part of Your Business Continuity Plan

Video should be an integral part of any effective enterprise communications strategy, but the business implications of COVID-19 are making it apparent just how important it is. This situation has illustrated the fact that even the biggest companies in the world can suddenly find themselves in the midst of a crisis

Viral pandemic isn’t the only sticky situation that can derail your company. You should also be aware of other issues such as natural disasters, data breaches, social media gaffes, and PR meltdowns, among other things. This is why it’s so crucial to have an effective business continuity plan. By planning ahead, your organization is able to respond calmly and effectively to any scenario, while keeping up morale in the company and boosting confidence amongst customers and partners. 

But sometimes, it isn’t enough to have a continuity plan written down on paper. The advent of video provides a unique opportunity for enterprises who want to breathe life into communications and confront the issues head-on with a human face. Here are some reasons you should integrate video into your corporate crisis communications strategy. 

It’s Important to Visually Reach Employees During a Disaster


Decades of research have shown that visual content can be processed more effectively by the brain. In fact, one researcher found that watching a one minute video is the equivalent to hearing 1.8 million words. This makes video an exponentially more effective medium for critical information, allowing the messaging to have a higher level impact, understanding, and retention. 

Disruptive events can create a host of issues for company leaders. Everything from lost productivity to employee assistance must be coordinated. It’s crucial that employees feel supported and hearing directly from the leadership team can help your teams regain a sense of normalcy in an uncertain situation. 

While it may be tempting to just send an email or post something on your company intranet, enterprise video gives senior leaders more control over messaging. It’s an easy way to tell a story in a more personalized way that is engaging for everyone at your organization. Executive leaders should always convey a tone that emphasizes security and confidence. Be sure to position yourself as the voice of reason and stability during this crucial time, don’t make false promises, and provide a message that is hopeful, rather than despondent. 

While these are external-facing communications, they are great examples of how your leadership team can use video for effective internal messaging during a crisis:

  • Back in 2013, President Obama had a lot riding on the launch of the Affordable Healthcare Act website. When things didn’t go as planned, people started to lose faith in the government’s competency to roll-out such an ambitious initiative. In a great PR move, Obama attacked the issue head-on by appearing on Zach Galifinakis’ show, “Between Two Ferns”. The video went viral, reached new demographics, and helped mitigate the mess with humor.

  • In the age of the cell phone, catching corporate blunders on video has become more ubiquitous. That’s exactly what happened to Starbucks in 2018 when two black men were kicked out of Starbucks, despite having done nothing wrong. The video spread like wildfire over social media, raising questions about racial bias in the company. 

To combat the backlash, Starbucks President and CEO, Kevin Johnson, wasted no time taking responsibility for the incident and even went as far as posting a video apology on the company’s website. Video allowed him to respond quickly with messaging that was clear, direct, and reassuring. He also appeared on several occasions, taking full ownership of the situation at every turn. 


  • Whole Foods co-CEOs, Walter Robb and John Mackey, stepped up to the plate when customers discovered they were being overcharged due to improperly weighted fruits and vegetables. Both appeared on video, owned up to the blunder, making clear it was never their intention to rip off shoppers and outlined the steps they were taking to fix the issue.

Align Business Objectives


For most organizations, distributing effective company-wide communication is difficult on the best of days. But in times of crisis, lack of information can fuel rumors and misinformation which can quickly take the place of facts. Video gives leaders the ability to quickly produce content that succinctly explains the details surrounding a crisis, what actions staff should take, and the company’s strategy for reducing impact on business. 

Once the initial shock of the crisis has passed, everyone’s attention will turn toward restoration efforts. As these endeavors get underway, it’s especially important to keep your workforce informed about next steps. Examples of things you may want to outline include, but are not limited to:

  • Updated office hours for the days/weeks ahead
  • Updated remote work policies
  • How to log time off work due to disaster
  • Child care policies
  • Which parts of a building may be unsafe
  • Road conditions
  • Dress codes
  • How to provide updates to your supervisor

Of course, next steps aren’t the only thing you should be providing clarity on. During a crisis, there’s a high probability that your employees will be distracted and off their game. They might be worried about the security of their jobs, their family, and feel isolated or disconnected if there have been work from home orders issued, as has been the case with the coronavirus pandemic. If your employees have been put into a position where business activities have been disrupted, video can help provide a quick directive for what to work on, and the expectations around timelines and deliverables. 

Create a “Single Source of Truth”


Not only does providing clear, concise executive and team lead video communication get everyone on the same page, storing that information in a central location should also be part of your crisis strategy. By providing employees with a central repository for updates, key information is accessible to everyone at any time, regardless of location or time zone. This is easily accomplished with a portal like CircleHD, where assets are created, stored, organized and easily captured for posterity. 

Encourage Employee Collaboration


Even when you’re not dealing with a crisis, video is still one of the most effective tools your company can use to call employees to action. A Gallup survey revealed that only 30 percent of full-time employees in the United States feel engaged at work. There is no doubt that this number gets amplified during times of unrest at work. This is why looking for alternative avenues of collaboration are so important and why video can support in a big way. 

Encourage your workforce to create content like: 

  • Tips the department can use
  • A problem they are working on and how they solved it
  • Fun content that shows their office or workspace if telecommuting
  • How they are spending their day

Employees are often a company’s most effective storytellers and an under-utilized content resource. Not only can you build team connections through effective video exercises, but it can also become good material for your marketing department to use externally.

Implementation and Best Practices


For video to become a natural part of your business continuity plan, you should employ the use of an enterprise video platform that can seamlessly integrate with your existing tech stack (we’re biased, but CircleHD is a great choice). These features are particularly important:

  • Enterprise-grade security: You’ll likely be sharing sensitive information, so your platform needs to incorporate the latest security protocols to keep communication from getting leaked. 
  • Access controls: The capability to restrict viewing to specific groups, teams, and individuals should be available. 
  • Mobile-friendly: Information should be readily available, allowing your employees to access the most up-to-date information at any time, from anywhere, regardless of if they have wifi access or not.
  • Analytics: Communication managers should have access to an extensive analytics suite that gives them insight into who is watching content, what they are watching and when. Utilizing these data points can also let you know who has seen your videos and who still needs to be informed. 

Of course, there’s still this prevailing idea that creating video content is difficult or requires costly investment. With all the advances in technology, that adage is no longer true. Today’s enterprise video platforms are both easy to use and integrate seamlessly into existing infrastructure–whether your company has a dedicated media room, or you’re just using the built-in audio/video features on your computer. 

More than any other type of corporate communication, your crisis messaging requires a high level of credibility and engagement that can only be produced by video content. People are 20 times more likely to retain information in the form of a story and video engages in a way that is not possible with text or still images, allowing you to convey the right message, to the right persons, at the right time. 


Crafting a Business Crisis Plan for COVID-19 and Beyond

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has had an unprecedented impact on global communities and businesses. From the cancellation of major events like SXSW, E3, and Collision Conference, to disrupted supply chains, not a corner of the world has been untouched by the mysterious disease. So it’s no surprise that organizations are working to create contingency plans in the event a serious disruption to their operations takes place.

The best time to prepare a business crisis plan is before you need it. Even when there isn’t a virus spreading, other emergencies may necessitate the need for your employees to change the way they work. If your organization is one of the 51% that don’t have procedures in place, there are steps you can take to keep your business activities as uninterrupted as possible. 

Come Together


When putting together any crisis plan, it’s important to form a task force to determine everyone’s roles and responsibilities. Depending on your business, it may include representatives from key areas like human resources, communications, sales, supply chain, health, safety, operations, and legal. Decide which person on your team is the ultimate decision-making authority and who is responsible for communicating pertinent information about the company’s situation with employees and external audiences like media and customers. 

Assess Your Risk


The first component of any effective business crisis plan is risk assessment, which identifies potential hazards that could disrupt your business functions and processes. While pandemic is certainly top-of-mind right now, other vulnerabilities may include public relations blunders, social media missteps, cyberattacks, data breaches, natural disasters, or product recalls.

Determine the Impact on Your Business


Newton’s third law of physics states that “every action has an equal and opposite reaction”, which is something all companies should keep in mind when developing a business crisis plan. In order to think clearly and make timely, well-informed decisions during the chaos, you should pre-emptively perform a business impact analysis (BIA). This will help your team consider every angle of a threat, revealing a litany of potential effects, such as:

  • Customer dissatisfaction
  • Lost or delayed sales
  • Increased expenses
  • Reputation damage
  • Regulatory fines
  • Legal ramifications

Put Contingencies In Place


Once you’ve identified the risks that could impact your business, it’s time to put actions in place that will help your company respond effectively to each scenario. Think about what steps and safeguards should be in place to resolve each crisis, what resources would be required, and how your team can help. 

For example, a social media misfire might result in your digital team issuing a statement across your online channels while customer teams are briefed on any official statements to relay. On the flip side, a product recall would require coordination across IT, customer service, sales, and public relations to minimize any impact on the company’s reputation. 

Create a Communications Plan


During times of crisis, it’s essential that critical information is communicated quickly and consistently across your various audiences. Your task force will need to agree on what information should be available publicly and what should be kept internal. We recommend putting messaging protocols in place ahead of time in order to expedite the approval of any company statements and prevent everyone from getting suffocated by endless editing. Be sure to consider if legal input will be needed. 

Review the audiences you will need to reach out to and assess what kind of communication they will need, as well as how you will deliver it. Will you send an email or a text? Do some audiences respond better to certain forms of communication over another? No matter which methods you use, it’s important to test your systems and tools ahead of time and make certain the tone in your messaging comes across as calm, collected and reasoned.

You’ll also want to think about how any relevant correspondence will be distributed and how workers can get the most timely information possible. Some businesses will utilize email or a company intranet, but a platform like CircleHD is especially helpful in this instance because it securely delivers information only to the people or teams you grant access to, cutting down on the chance that sensitive information could be leaked. CircleHD can also act as a central “hub” that gives your workforce access to the most up-to-date information available, at any time, even if there’s no internet connection available. 

Put Together an HR Plan


Perhaps one of the most striking effects of the COVID-19 outbreak has been the restriction on travel and working. Telecommuting (aka “remote work”), or the practice of working outside of the formal office, has been steadily gaining popularity over the last few years, buoyed by a host of digital productivity and collaboration tools like Zoom and Slack

According to FlexJobs, “Between 2005 to 2017, there was a 159% increase in remote work. In 2015, 3.9 million U.S. workers were working remotely. Today that number is at 4.7 million, or 3.4% of the population.” 

Despite the transformative possibilities of remote work, many companies have yet to put any formal procedures in place. The recent wave of coronavirus-related shutdowns should remind organizations why it’s imperative to implement and/or review their telecommuting policies. 

Equally as important, made prominent by the United States’ recently announced travel suspensions, your business crisis plan should include guidance about what happens in the event employees are prevented from leaving or returning home. 

Effective Communication is Key


In times of crisis, the way you communicate with your workforce and customers can make or break your reputation. It’s important to be direct, to the point, and as transparent as possible. Whether the incident is minor or, as in the case of COVID-19, a source of ongoing concern, providing frequent updates and outlining what precautions you are taking will reassure everyone involved. 

Make Your Plan Future-Proof


There’s a good chance that activating your crisis management plan won’t just be a “one and done” situation so it’s vital the plan remains updated and frequently updated to reflect the incorporation of new technologies, personnel turnover, and other variable changes. 



Recommendations for an Infectious Disease Outbreak Response Plan


With a seemingly endless stream of coronavirus developments unfolding hour to hour, it’s imperative that businesses have their infectious disease outbreak plan ready to go at any time. According to the CDC, employers should:

  • Ensure the plan is flexible and involve your employees in developing and reviewing your plan.
  • Conduct a focused discussion or exercise using your plan, to find out ahead of time whether the plan has gaps or problems that need to be corrected.

  • Share your plan with employees and explain what human resources policies, workplace and leave flexibilities, and pay and benefits will be available to them.

  • Share best practices with other businesses in your communities (especially those in your supply chain), chambers of commerce, and associations to improve community response efforts.

What You Should Include in a Coronavirus Response Plan:


  • Identify possible work-related exposure and health risks to your employees

  • Review human resources policies to make sure that policies and practices are consistent with public health recommendations and are consistent with existing state and federal workplace laws

  • Explore whether you can establish policies and practices, such as flexible worksites (e.g., telecommuting) and flexible work hours (e.g., staggered shifts), to increase the physical distance among employees 

  • For employees who are able to work remotely, managers should encourage employees to do so until symptoms are completely resolved. 

  • Ensure that you have the information technology and infrastructure needed to support multiple employees who may be able to work from home.

  • Identify essential business functions, essential jobs or roles, and critical elements within your supply chains (e.g., raw materials, suppliers, subcontractor services/products, and logistics) required to maintain business operations. 

  • Plan for how your business will operate if there is increasing absenteeism or these supply chains are interrupted.

  • Set up authorities, triggers, and procedures for activating and terminating the company’s infectious disease outbreak response plan, altering business operations (e.g., possibly changing or closing operations in affected areas), and transferring business knowledge to key employees. Work closely with your local health officials to identify these triggers.

  • Plan to minimize exposure between employees and also between employees and the public, if public health officials call for social distancing.

  • Establish a process to communicate information to employees and business partners on your infectious disease outbreak response plans and latest COVID-19 information. Anticipate employee fear, anxiety, rumors, and misinformation, and plan communications accordingly.

  • In some communities, early childhood programs and K-12 schools may be dismissed, particularly if COVID-19 worsens. Determine how you will operate if absenteeism spikes from increases in sick employees, those who stay home to care for sick family members, and those who must stay home to watch their children if dismissed from school. Businesses and other employers should prepare to institute flexible workplace and leave policies for these employees.

  • Local conditions will influence the decisions that public health officials make regarding community-level strategies; employers should take the time now to learn about plans in place in each community where they have a business.

  • If there is evidence of a COVID-19 outbreak in the US, consider canceling non-essential business travel to additional countries per travel guidance on the CDC website.
  • Travel restrictions may be enacted by other countries which may limit the ability of employees to return home if they become sick while on travel status.

  • Consider canceling large work-related meetings or events.

At the end of the day, any business crisis is a test of resilience, agility and cross-departmental communication. By having an adequate business crisis plan in place, your organization will be better prepared to face the unexpected and recover more quickly. 


If you’d like to learn more about business crisis plans and how CircleHD can enhance your plan of action, please reach out.


Using Sales Enablement for Better Training

Sales Enablement solutions are changing the sales operation landscape. Legacy, old-school learning systems are not user-friendly, and consumer grade solutions don’t offer important security and access controls needed by enterprises. To create and maintain a well-trained sales team, companies need to explore ways to improve their on-boarding, training, and information-sharing capabilities.

Today, a best-practice sales enablement platform should provide you with the ability to upload and intelligently organize video content, and to record training videos in a few clicks.

A sales enablement solution should also make it easy for all team members to share content with each other, and with external partners. By design, sales enablement should be open and collaborative, as well as secure.

What is Sales Enablement?

Sales enablement is the implementation of technology to make the on-boarding and training of sales teams more efficient and productive. Using a modern sales enablement platform will allow sales teams to sell with far more skill, and maintains all relevant sales collateral in an organized, shareable portal.

Discover the Benefits of Sales Enablement

From small businesses to Fortune 500 enterprises, sales enablement solutions help streamline the on-boarding process and speed up new-hire training.

Sales enablement helps companies communicate their processes and procedures, and share company updates faster.

1. 24/7 Training Availability

It’s hard to get the entire sales team together for training, updates and reporting. Salespeople today are in constant motion, navigating calls and meetings that often change on a moment’s notice.By contrast, creating videos and uploading them to a central location allows sales team members to view training content at the right time, when they can give the material their full attention.

2. Faster, Higher Quality Onboarding Of New Hires

Training new salespeople one at a time in an ad hoc manner is not efficient. Asking salespeople to read one-dimensional training documents is a low-quality learning experience compared with videos and slide presentations that combine graphics with audio explanations. A sales enablement platform gives you the most effective solution for efficient, high quality training.

3. Keep Company Information Current

Whenever there’s a change in business operations — changes to CRM software, product updates, and pricing changes — employees should be given an overview and some training.

The most efficient way to communicate these changes is to create instructional videos that can be uploaded and shared with the entire team; that remain available 24/7; and that can be accessed through any computer device.

Sales Enablement Manager

The Sales Enablement Manager plays a critical role in the sales team by providing dedicated support to our sales team’s success. This person typically has prior experience with highly technical and complex sales in the Enterprise space. They optimize the sales process, create amazing sales playbooks, manage certifications, and drive revenue campaigns. This person adepts at working with prospects as they are with working with customers. Sales Enablement Manager Job Description can be viewed here

Difference between Sales Enablement Manager and Sales Ops Manager?

At smaller organizations these roles may be used interchangeably. But at growth mode, Sales ops manager carries out many administrative and operational tasks required to run a sales organization. While Sales Enablement Manager focus on accelerating the sales team’s productivity and efficiency by implementing processes and guidelines for aligned team.

Learn More about Sales Enablement for your Business

Sales enablement is the easiest way to train your sales team and keep them up to date. Creating videos for your team to watch and reference again as needed will provide them with the best opportunity to succeed in their roles. Learn more about video enablement and how adding it to your sales enablement playbook will significantly improve sales team efficiency.


3 Ways to Create More Engaging Corporate Message Videos

Let’s face it. Corporate messages are boring and uninteresting. They’re not something your employees are looking forward to receiving unless they’re expecting good news. Most of the time, it’s something they see and forget.

If you want your employees and customers to take a greater interest in your announcements, your videos should appeal to them. You do not need to be a professional videographer to create entertaining corporate message videos. These tips will show you it’s easier than you think.

Involve your employees

Your employees have a lot to say. From feedback about their jobs, opinions about your products – the list is endless. Your workforce is a repository of ideas. All you need to do is harness them. You can conduct interviews to know what they think of a recent policy change. You can document their day at the office and show how happy (or unhappy) they are with their work. Being involved in the production of the videos and seeing themselves and their colleagues in the video announcements will make them more interested and engaged.

Create how-to videos

Don’t just tell about a certain process that would take place – show them how it’s done. Step-by-step tutorials, demos, or instructional guides help your employees understand the process better. Are you launching a new product? Why not create a video on how the product was conceptualized or document how it is created? By letting your audience have a glimpse of how things work, they’ll have a greater appreciation of that thing you’re trying to promote. 

Create “inappropriate” videos

One effective way of communicating a certain reminder or protocol is by highlighting the improper ways of doing things. A video about how a certain product is used can be more fun when it shows how NOT to use it instead. Rolling out new company policies? Having your employees act out how these policies are violated will definitely have more impact.

Conclusion

Corporate messages don’t have to be the plain, old, boring news bits they are. Maximize the power of video in producing entertaining corporate messages that your employees and customers will surely enjoy and remember.


4 Ways Video Can Improve Your External Communications

The challenges of external communication call for a means of communicating that allows you to connect with your stakeholders efficiently and effectively. In times when sending messages via email or conversations via phone call isn’t enough, video correspondence proves a great help.

Here are different ways how videos can help you connect with people outside your company and achieve the results you want.

Create educational materials for your partners and third-party contractors

Getting your suppliers and partners up to speed in terms of complying with your company’s ways of working and standards is more efficient if done with video. Training sessions with groups of people can easily be done via video e-learning platforms or video conferencing. Having face-to-face communication with them lessens the risk of miscommunicating and gives the participants the space to ask questions during the actual session.

Engage with the community you serve

Sharing your company’s story and how it impacts your local community can be done with a compelling video. These types of videos can also convey urgent messages to the community like communication after incidents concerning the community. They can also serve to inspire, motivate, and organize community members to get involved and rally for your cause.

Keep investors and shareholders in the loop

The fast-paced nature of managing businesses requires a quick, reliable communication platform, especially with investors and shareholders. Constant updates regarding the company’s finances and overall situation need to be shared to maintain investors’ trust and support. Communication using video helps make these updates quick and efficient. Meeting with shareholders face-to-face gives a personal touch that further promotes trust and confidence in your team.

Build trust and connections with new markets

Customers respond very well to marketing materials in video form. Videos are more engaging and are more powerful in terms of evoking the emotions of viewers. Aside from promoting your products and services, these videos can also extend support to your consumer base in terms of answering their queries, providing guidance on how your products work, and relaying business announcements.

Conclusion

Video communication allows you to cope with the constantly increasing demands of external relations. With videos, you can easily connect with your stakeholders and get your message across while having that personal touch.