Faster Employee Onboarding with Video

November 9, 2017 3:22 am Published by

Effective employee onboarding can be a tedious process.

Trainers, team leaders and managers have more responsibilities than “babysitting the new guy”, and company executives often have little time to give motivational speeches several times a month to a war-weary staff. Without the proper structures in place, onboarding procedures can become rushed and can miss several important details that employees need to learn and comprehend. Worse, bad onboarding can make potentially productive employees and staff feel lost and unmotivated, which can negatively impact the overall productiveness of the company.

One of the most effective emerging tools and solutions to the onboarding challenges is video onboarding. When structured the right way, video onboarding programs – which can be a combination of pre-recorded videos and real-time conferences and webinars – can be the difference that integrates the “new guy” quickly into the fold, and takes employees and staff to the next level of productivity.

Video Onboarding is Engaging

Because videos are more engaging than text or plain boring documents and slides, people generally respond better to video onboarding that just telling them to read through the company manuals. Studies show that humans can retain as much as 80% of material when presented in an effective, visual medium. This means that orientations, skills training and idea sharing can be significantly more effective when delivered through video.

Furthermore, emotion and non-verbal cues are more effectively conveyed through video, which can create a far deeper connection with staff and employees. This then leads to a stronger emotional investment, which instills in employees and staff a greater sense of “oneness” with the company and this subsequently translates into positive motivation to contribute.

Video Onboarding is Consistent

A pre-recorded video onboarding program, when properly designed and executed, delivers consistent results. Gathering the company’s best presenters into one video (or series of videos) is a sure-fire way to get your staff (the new guy included) “amped up” about the company and their roles in it. Pre-recording you best presenters – as well as the company executives – means that traffic, unforeseen family emergencies and sore throats cannot ruin the onboarding of employees. It also makes then onboarding process available anytime and anywhere the employees can have access to the database.

For some instances, follow-up live conferences or webinars can enhance the value of the pre-recorded material. The converse is also true, since all participants of the real-time conference are assumed to have gone through and understood the pre-recorded material. By feeding off one another, pre-recorded and live video onboarding systems can enhance the experience of the staff and create an overall “super-effect” that elevates the company’s overall performance much more than individual training modules.

Video Onboarding is Cost-Effective

Compared to multiple on-site training seminars, the cost of compiling a well-structured video onboarding database is minimal. A decent camera, a reasonably talented and skilled video editor and a first-class video content management system/database are nearly all the tools and personnel needed to create a well-structured video onboarding library – and all of these may already be untapped resources in the company.

Conclusion

Using video for employee onboarding is a great way of making your new hires engaged and feel at home. It is more interactive and more fun for employees at the same time efficient and cost effective for your Human Resources.

We at CircleHD understand your employee onboarding needs and have a wide variety of video solutions that can help get your new hires get a head start. Schedule a demo with us now and we’ll show you the many ways video platforms can be an essential part of your employee management processes.

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This post was written by circlehdteam

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